Nissan’s toughest pickup has turned volunteer in a new film to mark World Oceans Day 2018 (Friday June 8) and celebrate UK community heroes tackling beach plastic pollution.

A Cornish dad and daughter team’s plea for help with their local Beach Guardian project, inspired Nissan to volunteer its toughest pickup to help clear rubbish from some of Cornwall’s remotest beaches.

Beach Guardian is the brainchild of Emily Stevenson (21), a marine biology student, and her father Rob (50). The pair has been clearing waste from beaches in Cornwall for 10 years. They decided to set up the community group after realising the plastic problem was getting worse. They amassed an army of local volunteers to help, but they were struggling to reach remote locations and remove bulky rubbish with their family car, so they posted a request for help on social media.

Nissan responded by volunteering the new Navara OFF-ROADER AT32, which can be fitted with a snorkel and is designed for the most extreme landscapes. It helped Beach Guardian take on their most challenging beach plastic clean-up to date, reaching over rocky terrain and removing debris like plastic nets that had been deeply embedded in the sand for more than two years.

More than eight million tonnes of plastic end up in the world’s oceans every year with devastating consequences for marine wildlife, fisheries and tourism. During its recent Great British Beach Clean Up, the Marine Conservation Society found 718 pieces of litter for every 100 metre stretch of UK beach surveyed.

Alongside the film, Nissan is inviting community groups across Europe to nominate remote and tough-to-reach beaches or other locations where the Navara could help them clear plastic waste. And it is also encouraging its European employees to use its own volunteering program, Days for Change, to join local beach cleaning projects where appropriate.